Sadr region (y Cyg nebula and lots of DWBs, LBNs, LDNs and Barnard's Dark nebulae) now with added Oiii, Sii and a bit more Ha
The Sadr Region is a diffuse emission nebula region surrounding Sadr (Gamma Cygni). It's located in the center of Cygnus's cross. Sadr can't be seen in this image but it's very close out of the frame.
Pointing a telecope towards the Cygnus constellation will always reveal some interesting things. I decided to shoot this part of the region because of all the interesting bright and dark nebulae.
The HaRGB result that I recently shot with the ASI294MC didn't give me any pleasure, reason why I went back to it as soon as I replaced the ASI294MC with the QHY294M Pro and Baader filters.
Equipment used:
Sky-Watcher Eq3 Pro mount
Sky-Watcher EQ6-R
Teleskop-Service Ransburg TS65 Quadruplet imaging telescope
ZWO ASI Cameras ASI294MC PRO
Qhyccd QHY294M Pro
2" Antlia Astronomy Filter 3nm Ha
2" IDAS LPS D2
Baader Planetarium 36mm SHO filter set
Qhyccd Qhy5 LII-M guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Back garden, Bushey, UK (Bortle 7)
Date: 30.05.2021 to 18.09.2021
ASI294MC Pro:
24x600sec Antlia 3nm Ha Gain 200 Offset 10
55x180sec IDAS LPS D2 Gain 125 Offset 30
QHY294M Pro @Gain 1600 Offset 25:
56x300sec Baader Ha 7nm
49x300sec Baader Oiii 8.5nm
46x300sec Baader Sii 8nm
Total integration time: 19 hours and 20 minutes
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021

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The emission nebula Sharpless 112
Another target not so often imaged is Sharpless 112. SH2-112 is an emission nebula located around 6000 light years away in the constellation Cygnus.
Equipment used:
Eq6-R
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 3nm 1.25" Ha, Oiii ans Sii filters
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
70/400 Celestron guidescope
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 22.07 to 07.09.2021
Location: Bushey Herts, UK, bortle 7
Ha: 92x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Oiii: 62x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Sii: 53x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Total integration time 17 hours and 15 min
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021
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The Emission nebula SH2-124
Sh2-124 is an emission nebula that lies in northern constellation of Cygnus around 8, 500 light years away. There isn't much information about it and it's not imaged as often as other well known deep sky objects.
Equipment used:
Eq6-R
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 3nm 1.25" Ha, Oiii ans Sii filters
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
9x50mm finder-guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 18 to 22.07.2021
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Ha: 80x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Oiii: 50x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Sii: 50x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Total integration time 15 hours
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021
Full resolution here: https://www.astrobin.com/w1saw5
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Sharpless 132 - The Lion Nebula
Amateur Astronomy Photo of the Day (AAPOD2) 01.09.2021
Astronomy photo of the day by Astronomia.com 03.09.2021
Sharpless 132 is a very faint emission type nebula on the Cepheus/Lacerta border. It lies at a degree southeast of Epsilon Cep, and has a size of about 40 arc minutes. Sh2-132 is located at about 10400 light years in the Perseus Arm of the Milky Way , in the region of Cepheus OB1, a large, bright OB association . The stars responsible for the ionization of its gases are very hot and massive; in particular, two Wolf-Rayet stars , known by the initials HD and HD 211 564 211 853 (the latter also having the initials WR 153), as well as a star of spectral class O8.5V and a dozen stars of class B.
Equipment used:
Eq6-R
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 3nm 1.25" Ha, Oiii ans Sii filters
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
Celestron 70/400 TravelScope
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 01.06 to 15.07.2021
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Ha: 80x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Oiii: 60x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Sii: 50x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Total integration time 15 hours and 50 minutes
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021
Full resolution here.
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Sadr region (y Cyg nebula and lots of DWBs, LBNs, LDNs and Barnard's Dark nebulae)
The Sadr Region is a diffuse emission nebula region surrounding Sadr (Gamma Cygni). It's located in the center of Cygnus's cross. Sadr can't be seen in this image but it's very close out of the frame.
I decided to shoot this part of the region because of all the interesting bright and dark nebulae.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro mount
TS65 Quadruplet imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO
2" Antlia 3nm Ha
2" IDAS LPS D2
Qhy5 LII-M guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Back garden, Bushey, UK (Bortle 7)
Date: 30.05.2021 to 01.06.2021
24x600sec Antlia 3nm Ha
55x180sec IDAS LPS D2
Total integration time: 6 hours and 45 minutes
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Sharpless 115 stands just north and west of Deneb, the alpha star of Cygnus the Swan in planet Earth's skies. Noted in the 1959 catalog by astronomer Stewart Sharpless (as Sh2-115) the faint but lovely emission nebula lies along the edge of one of the outer Milky Way's giant molecular clouds, about 7,500 light-years away. Shining with the light of ionized atoms of hydrogen, sulfur, and oxygen in this Hubble palette color composite image, the nebular glow is powered by hot stars in star cluster Berkeley 90. The cluster stars are likely only 100 million years old or so and are still embedded in Sharpless 115. But the stars' strong winds and radiation have cleared away much of their dusty, natal cloud. At the emission nebula's estimated distance, this cosmic close-up spans just under 100 light-years.
SH2-116 is a small nebula that is also known as Abell 71 is an object was first classified as a planetary nebula but recent studies show it to be an HII region instead. The nebula surrounding SH2-116 is indeed part of SH2-115. The nebula does not respond well with normal RGB filters but you can use a red filter as a luminance if you do not have a H-Alpha filter. Using the hydrogen-alpha filter, you can easily pick up this object without exposing a very long time using a fast system.
Equipment used:
Eq6-R
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 3nm 1.25" Ha, Oiii ans Sii filters
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
9x50mm finder-guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 22.04 to 01.06.2021
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Ha: 107x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Oiii: 91x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Sii: 99x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Total integration time 24 hours and 45 minutes
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021
DWB111 - Propeller nebula in HaRGB
Amateur Astronomy Photo of the Day (AAPOD2) 18.06.2021
Published in the Sky & Telescope magazine - September 2021 issue
DWB 111 or Simeis 57, also known as the Propeller nebula is an emission nebula in the Cygnus constellation.
The distance from Earth is unknown but it is only a small part of a larger emission nebula.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro mount
TS65 Quadruplet imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO
2" Antlia 3nm Ha
2" IDAS LPS D2
Qhy5 LII-M guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Back garden, Bushey, UK (Bortle 7)
Date: 25.04.2021 to 30.05.2021
100x300sec Antlia 3nm Ha
60x180sec IDAS LPS D2
Total integration time: 11 hours and 20 minutes
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NGC4631 and NGC4656, Whale and Crowbar Galaxies

NGC 4631 (also known as the Whale Galaxy or Caldwell 32) is a barred spiral galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici. Located 30 million light-years from Earth this galaxy's slightly distorted wedge shape gives it the appearance of a herring or a whale, hence its nickname.
NGC 4656 is a highly warped barred spiral galaxy located 9.8 million light-years from Earth in the same constellation Canes Venatici or The hunting dogs and is sometimes informally called the Hockey Stick Galaxy or the Crowbar Galaxy.
The Crowbar galaxy is actually the result of 2 colliding galaxies, NGC4656 and NGC4657.
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
IDAS LPS-D2 2" filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 7
296x300sec Gain 125 Offset 30
Date: 06 to 17.04.2021
Total integration time: 24 hours and 40 minutes
Calibration and stack in Astropixel processor, edit in pixinsight and photoshop CC 2021
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Messier 92
Messier 92 (also known as M92, M 92, or NGC 6341) is a globular cluster of stars in the northern constellation of Hercules about 26,700 light-years away from the solar system.
It is one of the brighter of its sort in apparent magnitude in the northern hemisphere and in its absolute magnitude in the galaxy, but it is often overlooked by amateur astronomers due to angular proximity to dazzling cluster Messier 13.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertuned by Dark Frame Optics LTD
Skywatcher 200p
Baader MPCC coma corrector
IDAS LPS D1 Clip in filter
Canon 450Da
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
IDAS LPS-D2 2" filter
Qhy5II-L M guide camera
Canon 450Da + 200p:
IDAS LPS D1 Clip EOS: 30x120" (1h) ISO800
IDAS LPS D1 Clip EOS: 17x180" (51') ISO800
IDAS LPS D1 Clip EOS: 9x300" (45') ISO800
ASI294MC + TS65Q:
IDAS 2" LPS D2: 116x180" (5h 48') (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 1x1
Total integration: 8h 24'
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021
Full resolution on my astrobin account:
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The Cocoon Galaxy
The Cocoon galaxy
NGC 4490, also known as the Cocoon Galaxy, is a barred spiral galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici. It lies at a distance of 25 million light years from Earth. It interacts with its smaller companion NGC 4485 and as a result is a starburst galaxy. NGC 4490 and NGC 4485 are collectively known in the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies as Arp 269. NGC 4490 is located 3/4° northwest of beta Canum Venaticorum and with apparent visual magnitude 9.8, can be observed with 15x100 binoculars. It is a member of Herschel 400 Catalogue. It belongs in Canes Venatici galaxy cloud II.
It was discovered by William Herschel in 1788. Two supernovae have been observed in NGC 4490, SN 1982F, and type II-P SN 2008ax, with peak magnitude 13.0.
Equipment used:
Eq6
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 1.25" LRGB and 3nm 1.25" Ha filters
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
9x50mm finder-guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 16 to 25.04.2021
Location: Bushey, Herts, UK, bortle 7
Ha: 74x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Luminance: 33x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 125 Offset 30
Red: 80x180sec;
Green: 76x180sec;
Blue: 78x180sec; Bin 2x2, Gain 125 Offset 30
Total integration time 20 hours and 37 minutes
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021
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Close up of the Butterfly in the Sadr region
Published in the Astronomy Now magazine, July 2021
IC1318 or the Sadr region is the diffuse emission nebula surrounding Sadr (γ Cygni) at the center of Cygnus's cross. The Butterfly nebula is a beautiful part of this region and I decided to take a closer look at it as I love how the dark nebulosity looks like in this region.
Equipment used:
Eq6 Pro
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
Qhyccd QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at - 20°C
7x1.25" Starlight Xpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 7nm Ha, 8.5nm Oiii and 8nm Sii
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
Qhyccd Polemaster

Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 18.09 to 08.11.2019
Location: Bushey, bortle 6
41x600sec Ha
34x300sec and 20x600sec Oiii
17x300sec and 22x600sec Sii
Total integration time 18 hours
Stacked in Pixinsight and processed in Photoshop CC 2021
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Messier 3
Messier 3 is located approximately 34,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Canes Venatici. Also known as M3, GCl 25 and NGC 5272, it has an apparent magnitude of 6.2 and can be spotted using a pair of binoculars. This globular cluster was the first object in the Messier catalog to be discovered by the French astronomer Charles Messier himself. Messier spotted the cluster on May 3, 1764, mistaking it for a nebula without any stars. This misunderstanding of Messier 3’s nature was corrected in 1784 when the British astronomer William Herschel was able to resolve the cluster’s individual stars.
Containing about 500,000 stars, Messier 3 is one of the largest and brightest globular clusters ever discovered. However, what makes this cluster extra special is its unusually large population of variable stars. New variable stars continue to be discovered in Messier 3 to this day, but so far we know of 274, the highest number found in any globular cluster by far. At least 170 of these are of a special variety called RR Lyrae variables, which pulse with a period directly related to their intrinsic brightness.
Messier 3 also contains a relatively high number of so-called blue stragglers. These are blue main-sequence stars that appear to be young because they are bluer and more luminous than other stars in the cluster.
As all stars in globular clusters are believed to have formed together and thus be roughly the same age.
Only a difference in mass can give these stars a different color: a red, old star can appear bluer when it acquires more mass, for instance stripping it from a nearby star.
The extra mass changes it into a bluer star, which makes us think it is younger than it really is.
Equipment used:
Eq6 mount
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 1.25" RGB filters
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
9x50mm finder-guider
SW 130PDS
Astromodified Canon 700D
IDAS LPS D1 clip filter
TS65Q
QHY183M cooled at -20C
Qhyccd Polemaster

Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Dates: 17.03.2019 31.03.2021
Frames:
Baader Neodymium Filter: 73x60" (gain: 16.00) -20C bin 1x1
Chroma 1.25" Blue: 57x180" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 1.25" Green: 60x180" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 1.25" Red: 47x180" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
IDAS LPS D1 Clip EOS: 5x120" ISO800
IDAS LPS D1 Clip EOS: 34x135" ISO800
Integration: 10.9 hours
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight, EZ Processing Suite and Photoshop CC 2021
Full resolution on my astrobin account:
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Cygnus widefield in HaRGB
Astronomy Photo of the Day by GrAG 08.06.2021
Cygnus is a northern constellation lying on the plane of the Milky Way, deriving its name from the Latinized Greek word for swan. Cygnus is one of the most recognizable constellations of the northern summer and autumn, and it features a prominent asterism known as the Northern Cross (in contrast to the Southern Cross). Cygnus was among the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy, and it remains one of the 88 modern constellations.
Cygnus contains Deneb – one of the brightest stars in the night sky and the most distant first-magnitude star – as its "tail star" and one corner of the Summer Triangle. It also has some notable X-ray sources and the giant stellar association of Cygnus OB2. One of the stars of this association, NML Cygni, is one of the largest stars currently known. The constellation is also home to Cygnus X-1, a distant X-ray binary containing a supergiant and unseen massive companion that was the first object widely held to be a black hole. Many star systems in Cygnus have known planets as a result of the Kepler Mission observing one patch of the sky, an area around Cygnus.
For the RGB I used a full spectrum modified Canon 600D with an IDAS LPS-D1 CLIP filter and for the Ha, the astromodified Canon 700D with a Astronomik 6nm Ha clip in filter and for both I used the cheap nifty fifty, canon 50mm f1.8 @ f4.
RGB - 10x600sec ISO800 shot in Eversley, Bortle 4
Ha - 36x300sec ISO1600 shot in my back garden, Bortle 6
The cameras were mounted on a eq3 Pro mount and guided by PHD2
I used APT for capturing and stellarium for framing.
The original RGB photo was published in the BBC Sky at Night magazine but I was never happy with the HaRGB result that I got back then.
Full resolution and more details on my astrobin account: https://www.astrobin.com/0ncbpd/0/
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The Needle galaxy
NGC 4565 (also known as the Needle Galaxy or Caldwell 38) is an edge-on spiral galaxy about 30 to 50 million light-years away in the constellation Coma Berenices. It lies close to the North Galactic Pole and has a visual magnitude of approximately 10. It is known as the Needle Galaxy for its narrow profile. First recorded in 1785 by William Herschel, it is a prominent example of an edge-on spiral galaxy.
NGC 4565 is a giant spiral galaxy more luminous than the Andromeda Galaxy. Much speculation exists in literature as to the nature of the central bulge. In the absence of clear-cut dynamical data on the motions of stars in the bulge, the photometric data alone cannot adjudge among various options put forth. However, its exponential shape suggested that it is a barred spiral galaxy. Studies with the help of the Spitzer Space Telescope not only confirmed the presence of a central bar but also showed a pseudobulge within it as well as an inner ring.
NGC 4565 has at least two satellite galaxies, one of which is interacting with it. It has a population of roughly 240 globular clusters, more than the Milky Way.
NGC 4565 is one of the brightest member galaxies of the Coma I Group.
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 1.25" LRGB filters
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
9x50mm finder-guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Dates: 06.04 to 16.04.2021
Frames:
Chroma 1.25" RGB: 95x180" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 1.25" Lo-Glow LP filter: 80x300" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Integration: 21 hours
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight, EZ Processing Suite and Photoshop CC 2021
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 The Blue Horsehead
With the Dark Sky week coming to an end and the milky-way core with all the wonderful summer targets starting to show their beauty above the northern hemisphere horizon, I would like to share with you what can be achieved in a short time, under truly dark skies with only a modest dslr and a fast lens.
This is a photo shot 2 years ago on a trip to the bortle 2 skies of the wonderful Wales. That was the first and only time I have seen the clouds being lit up by the stars above and not by the light pollution, an absolutely incredible experience that I will never forget.
I only wish those amazing skies would be closer and available to all of us that love the stars.
The photo was taken with a modified canon 700d and a Samyang 135mm f2 lens on a eq3 mount. Total integration time is only one hour, made up of 21x3min exposures.
I hope you enjoy this magnificent target that is close to impossible to a lot of the UK fellow astrophotographers.
Full resolution and other details on my astrobin account.
Messier 44 - The Beehive Cluster
The Beehive Cluster (also known as Praesepe (Latin for "manger"), M44, NGC 2632, or Cr 189), is an open cluster located 610 light-years away in the constellation Cancer. One of the nearest open clusters to Earth, it contains a larger population of stars than other nearby bright open clusters. Under dark skies, the Beehive Cluster looks like a small nebulous object to the naked eye, and has been known since ancient times. Classical astronomer Ptolemy described it as a "nebulous mass in the breast of Cancer". It was among the first objects that Galileo studied with his telescope.
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
IDAS LPS-D2 2" filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 7
131x180sec Gain 125 Offset 30
Date: 29 and 30.03.2021
Total integration time: 6 hours and 30 minutes
Calibration and stack in Astropixel processor, edit in pixinsight and photoshop CC 2021
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Messier 81 and Messier 82, Bode's and Cigar galaxies

Discovered by the German astronomer Johann Elert Bode in 1774, M81 is one of the brightest galaxies in the night sky. It is located 11.6 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major and has an apparent magnitude of 6.9. Through a pair of binoculars, the galaxy appears as a faint patch of light in the same field of view as M82. The galaxy’s spiral arms, which wind all the way down into its nucleus, are made up of young, bluish, hot stars formed in the past few million years. They also host a population of stars formed in an episode of star formation that started about 600 million years ago. Ultraviolet light from hot, young stars is fluorescing the surrounding clouds of hydrogen gas. A number of sinuous dust lanes also wind all the way into the nucleus of M81.
The galaxy’s central bulge contains much older, redder stars. It is significantly larger than the Milky Way’s bulge. A black hole of 70 million solar masses resides at the center of M81 and is about 15 times the mass of the Milky Way’s central black hole. Previous Hubble research showed that the size of the black hole in a galaxy’s nucleus is proportional to the mass of the galaxy’s bulge.
M82 was discovered, along with its neighbor M81, by the German astronomer Johann Elert Bode in 1774. Located 12 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major, M82 has an apparent magnitude of 8.4 and is best observed in April. Although it is visible as a patch of light with binoculars in the same field of view as M81, larger telescopes are needed in order to resolve the galaxy’s core. M82 or the Cigar galaxy, shines brightly at infrared wavelengths and is remarkable for its star formation activity. The Cigar galaxy experiences gravitational interactions with its galactic neighbor, M81, causing it to have an extraordinarily high rate of star formation — a starburst.
Around the galaxy’s center, young stars are being born 10 times faster than they are inside our entire Milky Way galaxy. Radiation and energetic particles from these newborn stars carve into the surrounding gas, and the resulting galactic wind compresses enough gas to make millions of more stars. The rapid rate of star formation in this galaxy eventually will be self-limiting. When star formation becomes too vigorous, it will consume or destroy the material needed to make more stars. The starburst will then subside, probably in a few tens of millions of years.
Source: nasa.gov
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 1.25" LRGB and 3nm 1.25" Ha filters
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
9x50mm finder-guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Dates:Feb. 27, 2021 , April 4, 2021
Frames:
Chroma 1.25" Blue: 39x180" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 1.25" Blue: 18x300" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 1.25" Green: 41x180" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 1.25" Green: 15x300" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 1.25" Lum: 29x300" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 1.25" Red: 41x180" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 1.25" Red: 15x300" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 3nm Ha 1.25": 9x300" (gain: 200.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 3nm Ha 1.25": 41x600" (gain: 200.00) -15C bin 2x2
Chroma 1.25" Lo-Glow LP filter: 24x300" (gain: 125.00) -15C bin 2x2
Integration: 22.1 hours
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight, EZ Processing Suite and Photoshop CC 2021
Astrobin links:
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Jewels of Auriga, The Tadpoles, The Spider and The Fly

Imaging telescopes or lenses: TSAPO65Q TS - Optics TS APO65Q

Imaging cameras: ZWO ASI294MC Pro

Mounts: SkyWatcher EQ3 Pro SynScan GoTo

Guiding telescopes or lenses: Skywatcher 9x50 finder guider

Guiding cameras: QHYCCD QHY 5 II L M

Software: ProDigital StarSpikes Pro 4  ·  Noise Ninja 2 Noise Reduction  ·  Astro Pixel Precessor  ·  Adobe Phosotshop CC  ·  Stellarium  ·  Sequence Generator PRO  ·  PixInsight  ·  SharpCap pro

Filters: Antlia 3nm Ha 2"  ·  Optolong L-eXtreme 2"  ·  IDAS 2" LPS D2

Accessory: Pegasus Astro FocusCube  ·  QHYCCD Polemaster

Dates:Feb. 10, 2021 to March 17, 2021

Frames:
Antlia 3nm Ha 2": 25x600" bin 1x1
IDAS 2" LPS D2: 12x300" bin 1x1
Optolong L-eXtreme 2": 102x300" bin 1x1
Optolong L-eXtreme 2": 47x600" bin 1x1

Integration: 21.5 hours

Full resolution on my astrobin account

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Orion's belt and sword
Orion, The Hunter, is by far the most beautiful constellation of the winter sky in the northern hemisphere and with it comes a bundle of jewels for everyone's taste.
The belt of Orion, consisting of the 3 bright stars, Alnitak, Alnilam and Mintaka, are more or less evenly spaced in a straight line making it very easy to locate Orion in the night sky.
Just to the south of Alnitak, the easternmost star of Orion's belt you can find the famous Horsehead nebula and to the left of Alnitak, we have the beautiful Flame nebula that is also part of the much larger Orion molecular cloud complex.
Descending from the 'belt' you can easily find the asterism that make up the Orion's sword.
In the small line of three stars that make up Orion's Sword, the middle is in fact not a star but the Orion Nebula.
For full resolution and technical details, please visit my astrobin account.
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Simeis 147 (Spaghetti nebula)
Simeis 147, also known as the Spaghetti Nebula, SNR G180.0-01.7 or Sharpless 2-240, is a supernova remnant (SNR) in the Milky Way, straddling the border between the constellations Auriga and Taurus. Discovered in 1952 at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory using a 25-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, it is difficult to observe due to its extremely low brightness.
The nebulous area is fairly large with an almost spherical shell and filamentary structure. The remnant has an apparent diameter of approximately 3 degrees, an estimated distance of approximately 3000 (±350) light-years, and an age of approximately 40,000 years.
It is believed that after its stellar explosion a rapidly spinning neutron star known as pulsar PSR J0538+2817 was left behind in the nebula core, emitting a strong radio signal.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 3nm 1.25" Ha, Oiii
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
9x50mm finder-guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used: Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 21.01 to 24.01.2021
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Ha: 113x600sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Oiii: 15x300sec and 61x600sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Total integration time 30.2 hours
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021. Artificial star spikes added with StarSpike Pro 4
Full resolution also on my Astrobin account.
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NGC2112 in HaLRGB
NGC2112 is a 9th magnitude medium sized open cluster located 4 degrees northeast of Altanik, the east star of Orion's belt, 2800 light-years away from us and it contains about a hundred stars.
The cluster is being on top of the Barnard's loop covering the eastern region of Orion. With an estimated age of around 2 billion years this relatively loose cluster lies in a fairly rich field and most of the stars are faint. In a 6-inch scope, look for a smattering of only a few 12th-13th magnitude stars.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 1.25" RGB and 3nm Ha filter
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
9x50mm finder-guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:  Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 25.01 to 18.02.2021
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Ha: 18x300sec and 13x600sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
RGB: 12x180sec per channel Bin 2x2, Gain 125 Offset 30
Total integration time 5 hours and 28 minutes
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021
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Trifid and Lagoon nebulae and the M21 star cluster
Trifid nebula (M20),  Lagoon nebula (M8) and the M21 star cluster (rework 2021)
Discovered by Charles Messier in 1764, M20 is a star-forming nebula located 9,000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. Also known as the Trifid Nebula (center left), M20 has an apparent magnitude of 6.3 and can be spotted with a small telescope. Its name means “divided into three lobes” and it is best observed during August. The Trifid nebula is an H II region catalogued as Messier 20 or M20 and as NGC 6514). The object is an unusual combination of an open cluster of stars; an emission nebula (the lower, red part), a reflection nebula (the upper, blue part) and a dark nebula (the apparent 'gaps' within the emission nebula that cause the trifurcated appearance; these are also designated Barnard 85).
Viewed through a small telescope, the Trifid Nebula is a bright and peculiar object, and is thus a perennial favorite of amateur astronomers.
The most massive star that has formed in this region is HD 164492A, an O7.5III star with a mass more than 20 times the mass of the Sun. This star is surrounded by a cluster of approximately 3100 young stars.
The Lagoon Nebula (top right) (catalogued as Messier 8 or M8, NGC 6523, Sharpless 25, RCW 146, and Gum 72) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as an H II region. The Lagoon Nebula is estimated to be between 4,000-6,000 light-years from the Earth. Like many nebulae, it appears pink in time-exposure color photos but is gray to the eye peering through binoculars or a telescope, human vision having poor color sensitivity at low light levels.
Messier 21 (top left) or M21 is an open cluster of stars in the constellation of Sagittarius located at 4250ly from Earth. It was discovered and catalogued by Charles Messier on June 5, 1764. M21 is a relatively young cluster of a mere 4.6 million years of age.
Messier 21, this is an outstanding cluster for small telescopes and binoculars.
A compact, symetrical cluster of bright stars with a nice double system of 9th and 10th magnitude located at its center.
It lies very close to the Trifid Nebula. In the cluster is the grouping called Webb's Cross, which consists of several stars of 6th and 7th magnitude, arranged in a cross.
Several amaturs report that some stars within the cluster show definite tints of blue, red and yellow.

Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
QHY10 OSC cooled at -15C
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider

Software used:
Eqmod, APT, Stellarium with StellariumScope, Astrotortilla, PHD2
Location: Beachy Head, UK, Bortle 4
Date: 04.08.2018
The image is the result of 9x600sec, Bin 1x1, Gain 15 and Offset 118 exposures stacked in APP and processed in Pixinsight and PS CC 2020.
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Messier 106 galaxy, a few other small ones and the furthest object that
I ever captured
Quasar 7C 121446.70+472852.00 – Magnitude 19.5 quasar – 15 billion light years away
APOD by Astronomia.com 14.03.2021
Messier 106 (also known as NGC 4258) is an intermediate spiral galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1781. M106 is at a distance of about 22 to 25 million light-years away from Earth. M106 contains an active nucleus classified as a Type 2 Seyfert, and the presence of a central supermassive black hole has been demonstrated from radio-wavelength observations of the rotation of a disk of molecular gas orbiting within the inner light-year around the black hole. NGC 4217 located at 61.6 Mly away, is a possible companion galaxy of Messier 106. A Type II supernova was observed in M106 in May 2014.
M106 has a water vapor megamaser (the equivalent of a laser operating in microwave instead of visible light and on a galactic scale) that is seen by the 22-GHz line of ortho-H2O that evidences dense and warm molecular gas. These water vapors give M106 its characteristic purple color. Water masers are useful to observe nuclear accretion disks in active galaxies. The water masers in M106 enabled the first case of a direct measurement of the distance to a galaxy, thereby providing an independent anchor for the cosmic distance ladder. M106 has a slightly warped, thin, almost edge-on Keplerian disc which is on a subparsec scale. It surrounds a central area with mass 4 × 107M☉ (solar masses).
It is one of the largest and brightest nearby galaxies, similar in size and luminosity to the Andromeda Galaxy. The supermassive black hole at the core has a mass of (3.9±0.1)×107 M☉ (solar masses).
M106 has also played an important role in calibrating the cosmic distance ladder. Before, Cepheid variables from other galaxies could not be used to measure distances since they cover ranges of metallicities different from the Milky Way's. M106 contains Cepheid variables similar to both the metallicities of the Milky Way and other galaxies' Cepheids. By measuring the distance of the Cepheids with metallicities similar to our galaxy, astronomers are able to recalibrate the other Cepheids with different metallicities, a key fundamental step in improving quantification of distances to other galaxies in the universe.
In the annotated photo you will see a significant number of other small galaxies, some of them being a few billion light years away.
The distance of the other NGC catalogued galaxies in the photo are as follows: NGC4217 - 61.6 Mly; NGC4220 - 44 Mly; NGC4248 - 24.5 Mly; NGC4232 - 336 Mly
When trying to find how far some of these galaxies are, I stumbled upon Victor Van Puyenbroeck's website,  where I found much more than I was expecting, and that being a quasar 15 billion light years away.
A quasar (also known as a quasi-stellar object, abbreviated QSO) is an extremely luminous active galactic nucleus (AGN), in which a supermassive black hole with mass ranging from millions to billions of times the mass of the Sun is surrounded by a gaseous accretion disk. As gas in the disk falls towards the black hole, energy is released in the form of electromagnetic radiation, which can be observed across the electromagnetic spectrum. The power radiated by quasars is enormous; the most powerful quasars have luminosities thousands of times greater than a galaxy such as the Milky Way.
The last photo is a crop of the annotated one, highlighting the location of the magnitude 19.5 quasar, 7C 121446.70+472852.00.
This is by far the furthest deep sky object that I captured in any of my photos.
I also took from Victor's website the distance of some of other faint galaxies found in the cropped photo.
PGC2296601 - 338 mly
PGC213962 - 428 mly
PGC2297038 - 932 mly
PGC2300151 - 2,455 mly
PGC2299019 - 3,746 mly
PGC2299122 - 3,814 mly
No data available for PGC2300125 and PGC2300116.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 1.25" LRGB and 3nm 1.25" Ha filters
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
9x50mm finder-guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 24.01 to 04.02.2021
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Ha: 19x300sec, 64x600sec, Gain 200 Offset 10
Luminance: 58x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 125 Offset 30
Red: 30x180sec and 11x300sec; Green: 31x180sec and 9x300sec; Blue: 31x180sec and 9x300sec; Bin 2x2, Gain 125 Offset 30
Total integration time 24.1 hours
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021
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M97 and M108 - Owl nebula and Surboard galaxy
The Owl Nebula (bottom right)(also known as Messier 97, M97 or NGC 3587) is a planetary nebula located approximately 2,030 light years away in the constellation Ursa Major. It was discovered by French astronomerPierre Méchain on February 16, 1781.[5] When William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, observed the nebula in 1848, his hand-drawn illustration resembled an owl's head. It has been known as the Owl Nebula ever since.
The nebula is approximately 8,000 years old. It is approximately circular in cross-section with a little visible internal structure. It was formed from the outflow of material from the stellar wind of the central star as it evolved along the asymptotic giant branch. The nebula is arranged in three concentric shells, with the outermost shell being about 20–30% larger than the inner shell. The owl-like appearance of the nebula is the result of an inner shell that is not circularly symmetric, but instead forms a barrel-like structure aligned at an angle of 45° to the line of sight.
Messier 108 (top left)(also known as NGC 3556 or the Surfboard galaxy) is a barred spiral galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major. It was discovered by Pierre Méchain in 1781 or 1782. From the perspective of the Earth, this galaxy is seen almost edge-on.
Distance: 45.9 million light years
Apparent magnitude: +10.7
Number of stars: 400 billion
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
IDAS LPS-D2 2" filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used: Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 7
105x300sec Gain 125 Offset 30
32x600sec Gain 125 Offset 30
Date: 18.01.2021 to 04.02.2021
Total integration time: 14 hours and 5 minutes
Calibration and stack in Astropixel processor, edit in pixinsight and Photoshop CC2020
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Messier 78
Messier 78 or M 78, also known as NGC 2068, is a reflection nebula in the constellation Orion.
M78 is the brightest diffuse reflection nebula of a group of nebulae that includes NGC 2064, NGC 2067 and NGC 2071. This group belongs to the Orion B molecular cloud complex and is about 1,350 light-years distant from Earth. M78 is easily found in small telescopes as a hazy patch and involves two stars of 10th and 11th magnitude. These two B-type stars, HD 38563 A and HD 38563 B, are responsible for making the cloud of dust in M78 visible by reflecting their light.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
Altair 2" TriBand filter
IDAS LPS-D2 2" filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date: 03.11.2019 to 16.02.2020
Total integration time: 17.6 hours
Calibration and stack in Astropixel processor, edit in pixinsight and photoshop
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IC1396 - The Elephant's Trunk nebula
The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is a concentration of interstellar gas and dust within the much larger ionized gas region IC 1396 located in the constellation Cepheus about 2,400 light years away from Earth. The piece of the nebula shown here is the dark, dense globule IC 1396A; it is commonly called the Elephant's Trunk nebula because of its appearance at visible light wavelengths, where there is a dark patch with a bright, sinuous rim. The bright rim is the surface of the dense cloud that is being illuminated and ionized by a very bright, massive star (HD 206267) that is just to the east of IC 1396A.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
Skywatcher explorer 130pds
Skywatcher x0.9 coma corrector
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
Qhyccd QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at - 20°C
7x1.25" Starlight Xpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 7nm Ha, 8.5nm Oiii and 8nm Sii
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, APT, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2,
Stellarium with stellariumScope,
SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Bushey,  bortle 6
76x300sec Ha Gain 11, Offset 8 with the 130pds
And with the AT106 I used the camera at Gain 16 and Offset 76
9x600sec Ha
30x600sec Sii
36x600sec Oiii
Calibration, stacking and channel blending in PixInsight
Processing in Pixinsight and
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NGC7380 - The Wizard Nebula
Located 7200 light years away, the Wizard nebula, surrounds developing open star cluster NGC 7380. Visually, the interplay of stars, gas, and dust has created a shape that appears to some like a fictional medieval sorcerer. The active star forming region spans about 100 light years, making it appear larger than the angular extent of the Moon. The Wizard Nebula can be located with a small telescope toward the constellation of the King of Aethiopia (Cepheus). Although the nebula may last only a few million years, some of the stars being formed may outlive our Sun.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
Qhyccd QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at - 20°C
7x1.25" Starlight Xpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 7nm Ha, 8.5nm Oiii and 8nm Sii
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 14.09 to 11.12.2019
Location: Bushey, bortle 6
1x600sec Ha @ gain 11, offset 8
20x300sec Ha @ gain 11, offset 8
40x600sec Ha @ gain 16, offset 76
40x600sec Oiii @gain 11, offset 8
40x600sec Sii @ gain 16, offset 76
Total integration time 21 hours and 50 minutes
Stacked in Pixinsight and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2020
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NGC 1528 and NGC 1545 or the m&m double cluster
NGC 1528 (Top left)
NGC 1528 is an open cluster with about 165 stars, with the brightest set in the order of magnitude 8.7... It stretches over about 13 year light into space. It has an estimated age of about 300-370 million years ago It is approximately at 1530 years light in away from us.
NGC 1545 (Bottom Right)
NGC 1545 is located in the constellation Perseus an open cluster and Is approximately 2,300 light years away
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro mount
TS65 Quadruplet imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO CMOS camera cooled at -15C
IDAS LPS-D2 filter
Qhy5L-II M guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Back garden, Bushey, UK (Bortle 7)
Date: 29.12.2021 and 26.01.2021
70x300sec and 50x180sec Gain 125 Offset 30
Total integration time: 8 hours and 20 minutes
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NGC1501 and NGG1502
NGC 1501 is a complex planetary nebula located in the constellation of Camelopardalis. It is also known as the Oyster Nebula. NGC 1502 is a small open cluster of around 45 stars.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro mount
TS65 Quadruplet imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO
IDAS LPS-D2 filter
Qhy5L-II M guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Back garden, Bushey, UK (Bortle 7)
Date: 09, 15 and 17.01.2021
50x300sec Gain 125 Offset 30
Total integration time: 4 hours and 10 minutes
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Rosette nebula and the Bok Globules "Animal parade"
Published in the Astronomy Now Magazine and the BBC Sky at Night Magazine, April 2021
Even though Monoceros is a rather inconspicuous constellation, it more than makes up for with its many beautiful telescopic treasures. One of the most attractive deep sky objects in Monoceros is NGC 2244, a bright open star cluster visible even with the naked eye under good conditions. It is believed that the cluster’s stars formed about 500,000 years ago from a surrounding nebula, a gigantic wreath of gases and dust called the Rosette Nebula.
The Rosette nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is an H II region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. It spans about 50 light-years across, lies about 4,500 light-years away, and can be seen with a small telescope. The radiation from the young stars in the NGC 2244 cluster, excites the atoms in the nebula, causing them to emit radiation themselves producing the emission nebula we see. The mass of the nebula is estimated to be around 10,000 solar masses.
Noted for the common beauty of its overall shape, parts of the Rosette Nebula, also known as NGC 2237, show beauty even when viewed up close. Visible in the second photo are globules of dark dust and gas or pockets of dust and gas called Bok Globules. They usually contain new born protostars. These globules are slowly being eroded away by the energetic light and winds by nearby massive stars. Left alone long enough, the molecular-cloud globules would likely form stars and planets.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ASI294MM Pro Cmos camera, cooled at - 15°C
8x1.25" ZWO USB filterwheel
Chroma 3nm 1.25" Ha, Oiii ans Sii filters
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
9x50mm finder-guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 21.01 to 24.01.2021
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Ha: 39x300sec and 1x600sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Oiii: 10x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 30
Sii: 10x300sec Bin 2x2, Gain 200 Offset 10
Total integration time 6 hours and 5 minutes
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021
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NGC 6820 and NGC 6823
NGC 6820 is a small reflection nebula near the open cluster NGC 6823 in Vulpecula. The reflection nebula and cluster are embedded in a large faint emission nebula called Sh 2-86. The whole area of nebulosity is often referred to as NGC 6820.
Open star cluster NGC 6823 is about 50 light years across and lies about 6000 light years away. The center of the cluster formed about two million years ago and is dominated in brightness by a host of bright young blue stars. Outer parts of the cluster contain even younger stars. It forms the core of the Vulpecula OB1 stellar association.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
QHYCCD QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at -20°C
7x1.25" StarlightXpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 7nm Ha, 8.5nm Oiii and 8nm Sii
QHYCCD QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
QHYCCD Polemaster

Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2,Stellarium with StellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment.
Location: Bushey, bortle 6
40x600sec Ha
32x600sec Oiii
32x600sec Sii
Total integration time: 17 hours and 20 minutes
Gain 16, Offset 76
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The Orion and Running man nebulae in HaRGB
The Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated in the Milky Way, being south of Orion's Belt in the constellation of Orion. It is one of the brightest nebulae, and is visible to the naked eye in the night sky. M42 is located at a distance of 1,344 ± 20 light years and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth. The M42 nebula is estimated to be 24 light years across. It has a mass of about 2,000 times that of the Sun. Older texts frequently refer to the Orion Nebula as the Great Nebula in Orion or the Great Orion Nebula.
The Running Man Nebula, also known as NGC 1977, vaguely resembles a colorful space ghost sprinting through the stars in the Orion constellation. Located 1,600 light-years away from Earth, this cloud of interstellar dust and gas shares its cosmic neighborhood with two smaller nebulas, NGC 1973 and NGC 1975.
The Ha data has been captured in Italy by my friend, Mihai Ghita, who gladly accepted to let me use his data to bring out some of the background hydrogen alpha.
Equipment used for the RGB:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
Canon 700D astro modified
IDAS LPS-D1 clip in filter
ZWO ASI294MC Pro
2" IDAS LPS-D2
2" Altair Tri-Bad filter
Qhy5 and QHY5II-L M guide cameras
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, APT, SGP, Sharpcap (for PA), Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Back garden, Bushey, UK (Bortle 7)
Date: 07.01.2018 and 19.11 to 19.12.2020
RGB: 30x30sec, 31x120sec, 29x300sec (3 hours and 57min)
Ha: 30x600sec (5 hours)
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NGC7635 and NGC7538
NGC 7635, also known as the Bubble Nebula, Sharpless 162, or Caldwell 11, is an H II region emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia. The "bubble" is created by the stellar wind from a massive hot, 8.7 magnitude young central star, SAO 20575 (BD+60°2522). The nebula is near a giant molecular cloud which contains the expansion of the bubble nebula while itself being excited by the hot central star, causing it to glow. It was discovered in 1787 by William Herschel.
NGC 7538, near the more famous Bubble Nebula, is located in the constellation Cepheus about 9,100 light-years from Earth. It is home to the biggest yet discovered protostar which is about 300 times the size of the Solar System. It is located in the Cepheus' Arm of the Milky Way and is probably part of the Cassiopeia OB2 complex. It is a region of active star formation including several luminous near-IR and far-IR sources. Stars in NGC 7538 are mainly low-mass pre-main-sequence stars.

Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro mount
TS65 Quadruplet imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO
Altair 2" Tri-Band filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Back garden, Bushey, UK (Bortle 7)
Date: 25.10.2020 to 19.11.2020
74x300sec Tri-Band
Total integration time: 6 hours and 10 minutes
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Messier 36 or M36, also known as NGC 1960, is an open cluster of stars in the Auriga constellation. It was discovered by Giovanni Batista Hodierna before 1654, who described it as a nebulous patch. The cluster was independently re-discovered by Guillaume Le Gentil in 1749, then Charles Messier observed it in 1764 and added it to his catalogue. M36 is at a distance of about 1,330 pc (4,340 light years) away from Earth.
The cluster is very similar to the Pleiades cluster (M45), and if it were the same distance from Earth it would be of similar magnitude.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
Altair Astro 6" RC
Astrp physics CCDT67 reducer
QHYCCD QHY163M Coldmos, cooled at -20°C
7x1.25" StarlightXpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" LRGB filters
QHYCCD QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
QHYCCD Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, Stellarium with StellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment.
Location: Bushey, bortle 7
Date: 28.10.2020;
5x180sec Luminance
6x180sec for each R, G and B
Total integration time: 33 minutes
Gain 100, Offset 70
Calibration and stacking in APP, processed in Photoshop CC 2020
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The Crescent Nebula in HOO

The Crescent Nebula (also known as NGC 6888, Caldwell 27, Sharpless 105) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, about 5000 light-years away from Earth. It was discovered by William Herschel in 1792. It is formed by the fast stellar wind from the Wolf-Rayet star WR 136 (HD 192163) colliding with and energizing the slower moving wind ejected by the star when it became a red giant around 250,000 to 400,000 years ago.
It is a rather faint object located about 2 degrees SW of Sadr. For most telescopes it requires a UHC or OIII filter to see. Under favorable circumstances a telescope as small as 8 cm (with filter) can see its nebulosity. Larger telescopes (20 cm or more) reveal the crescent or a Euro sign shape which makes some to call it the "Euro sign nebula".

Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
Skywatcher 130pds f5 newtonian telescope
Skywatcher x0.9 coma corrector
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
QHYCCD QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at -20°C
7x1.25" StarlightXpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 7nm Ha 8.5nm Oiii
QHYCCD QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
QHYCCD Polemaster

Software used:
Eqmod, APT - Astro Photography Tool, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, Stellarium with StellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment.

Location: Bushey, bortle 6
Date: 21.04.2019; 15.05.2019; 06, 19, 22 and 24.07.2019; 08.08.2019

74x300sec Gain 11 and 15x600sec Gain 16 for Ha
40x600sec Gain 16 for Oiii
Total integration time: 15.3 hours

Calibration in Pixinsight with Dark frames, Flat frames and Dark Flat frames, stacking, alignment of the filters and dynamic crop also in Pixinsight.
Processing in Photoshop CC 2020
 

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SH2-155, The Cave Nebula (Widefield HaRGB)
Sh2-155 (also designated Caldwell 9, Sharpless 155 or S155) is a diffuse nebula in the constellation Cepheus, within a larger nebula complex containing emission, reflection, and dark nebulosity.
It is widely known as the Cave Nebula, though that name was applied earlier to Ced 201, a different nebula in Cepheus.
Sh2-155 is an ionized H II region with ongoing star formation activity, at an estimated distance of 725 parsecs (2400 light-years) from Earth.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro mount
TS65 Quadruplet imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO
Astronomik 6nm Ha clip in filter
Altair 2" Tri-Band filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Back garden, Bushey, UK (Bortle 6)
Date: 25.10.2020 to 19.11.2020
158x300sec Ha
100x300sec Tri-Band
Total integration time: 21 hours and 30 minutes
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NGC 5005
NGC 5005 (Caldwell 29) is an inclined spiral galaxy in the constellation Canes Venatici with a relatively bright nucleus but with a bright disk that contains multiple dust lanes. The galaxy's high surface brightness makes it an object that is visible to amateur astronomers using large amateur telescopes.
Distance measurements for NGC 5005 vary from 45 million light-years to 113 million light-years, averaging about 65 million light-years.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE (690mm) APO Triplet with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
Qhyccd QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at - 20°C
7x1.25" Starlight Xpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, Baader neodymium for luminance and RGB
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Bushey, UK bortle 6
310x120sec Luminance
150x120sec for each RGB
Total integration time 15 hours and 20 minutes
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2020
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NGC7822 in Hubble Palette
NGC 7822 is a young star forming complex in the constellation of Cepheus. The complex encompasses the emission region designated Sharpless 171, and the young cluster of stars named Berkeley 59. The complex is believed to be around 2900 light years away with the younger components aged no more than a few million years. The complex also includes one of the hottest stars discovered within 1 kpc of the Sun, namely BD+66 1673, which is an eclipsing binary system consisting of an O5V that exhibits a surface temperature of nearly 45,000 K and a luminosity about 100,000 times that of the Sun. The star is one of the primary sources illuminating the nebula and shaping the complex's famed pillars of creation-type formations, the elephant trunks.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
Skywatcher 130pds f5 newtonian telescope
Skywatcher x0.9 coma corrector
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
QHYCCD QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at -20°C
7x1.25" StarlightXpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 7nm Ha, 8.5nm Oiii and 8nm Sii
QHYCCD QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
QHYCCD Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, APT - Astro Photography Tool, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, Stellarium with StellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment.
Location: Bushey, bortle 6
Date: 18.02.2019; 28, 29, 30.06.2019; 02, 03, 04, 15.07.2019; 02, 03.08.2019
87x300sec Ha
54x300sec and 39x600sec Oiii
39x300sec and 34x600sec Sii
Total integration time: 27 hours and 10 minutes
Gain 11, Offset 8 and Gain 16, Offset 76
Calibration in Pixinsight with Dark frames, Flat frames and Dark Flat frames, stacking, alignment of the filters and dynamic crop also in Pixinsight.
Processing in Photoshop CC 2020
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Jewels of the Orion Constellation in L(Ha)R(Ha)GB
Widefield photo of the Horsehead nebula and a few of the companions in the region of the bright star Alnitak (ζ Ori)
The main target in the photo is the Horsehead Nebula. Also known as Barnard 33, the Horsehead nebula is a small dark nebula in the constellation Orion. The nebula is located just to the south of Alnitak, the easternmost star of Orion's Belt, and is part of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. It appears within the southern region of the dense dust cloud known as Lynds 1630, along the edge of the much larger, active star-forming H II region called IC 434.
The Horsehead Nebula is approximately 422 parsecs or 1,375 light-years from Earth and it is one of the most identifiable nebulae because of its resemblance to a horse's head.
Another well defined target captured in the photo is the Flame nebula
Designated as NGC 2024 and Sh2-277, the Flame nebula is an emission nebula located about 900 to 1,500 light-years away.
The bright star Alnitak (ζ Ori), the easternmost star in the Belt of Orion, shines energetic ultraviolet light into the Flame and this knocks electrons away from the great clouds of hydrogen gas that reside there. Much of the glow results when the electrons and ionized hydrogen recombine. Additional dark gas and dust lies in front of the bright part of the nebula and this is what causes the dark network that appears in the center of the glowing gas.
NGC 2023 is an emission and reflection nebula. This reflection nebula is one of the largest in the sky, with a size of 10 × 10 arcminutes, it is located at a distance of 1,300 ly (400 pc) from the Sun, and is positioned ~15′ to the northeast of the Horsehead Nebula.
The reflection nebula is illuminated by the Herbig Ae/Be star HD 37903, which has a spectral class of about B2 Ve. The region around the central star is radiating fluorescent molecular hydrogen emission at a near-infrared range.
IC 431 and IC 432 are two reflection nebulae just northwest of the far Flame Nebula and and the last one IC 435 is another small reflection nebula further east of the Horsehead Nebula.
This is a combination of RGB shot with an astromodified canon 700D and the TS65Q telescope in 2017, during my first ever trip to a location with darker skies, and Ha shot last week in my back garden, with the same telescope but with the ASI294MC that I'm using now and a Astronomik 6nm filter.
Full details on the equipment, capturing details and full resolution of the image can be found on my astrobin account :
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The Great Orion Nebula

 Believed to be the cosmic fire of creation by the Maya of Mesoamerica, M42 blazes brightly in the constellation Orion. Popularly called the Orion Nebula, this stellar nursery has been known to many different cultures throughout human history. The nebula is only 1,500 light-years away, making it the closest large star-forming region to Earth and giving it a relatively bright apparent magnitude of 4. Because of its brightness and prominent location just below Orion’s belt, M42 can be spotted with the naked eye, while offering an excellent peek at stellar birth for those with telescopes. It is best observed during January.

Appearing like glistening precious stones, M42’s Trapezium cluster, named for the trapezoidal arrangement of its central massive stars, is brightening the core of nebula in such a way that different lenght exposures are needed to show it in the final photo. All of the members of the Trapezium were born together in this hotbed of star formation.

Source: nasa.gov


Equipment used:

Eq6 Hypertuned gen2

Skywatcher 200p

Upgraded Carbon fibre Skywatcher 10" quattro

Astromodified Canon 700D

QHY10 osc cooled CCD

Skywatcher 0.9x coma corrector

Baader mpcc iii coma corrector

IDAS LPS-D1

IDAS LPS-D1Clip filter

Lacerta mgen standalone autoguider

9x50 finder-guider

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LDN 1235 - The Dark Shark Nebula
LDN 1235 is known as the Shark or Dark Wolf Nebula (whichever is your favorite!). Dark dust like that featured here is created in the cool atmospheres of giant stars. After being expelled with gas and gravitationally recondensing, massive stars may carve intricate structures into their birth cloud using their high energy light and fast stellar winds as sculpting tools. The heat they generate evaporates the murky molecular cloud as well as causing ambient hydrogen gas to disperse and glow red. Including smaller dust nebulae such as Lynds Dark Nebula 1235 and Van den Bergh 149 & 150, the nebula spans about 15 light years and lies about 650 light years away toward the constellation of Cepheus.
Source: Casey Good, Good Astronomy
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
IDAS LPS D1 2" filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, N.I.N.A., Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2, Platesolve2
Location: Bignor, Bortle 4
Date: 30.08.2019
The image is the result of 67x180sec Gain 200 Offset 10 exposures stacked and calibrated in APP with dark, flat and dark flat frames. Tweaked in APP and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2020.
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Messier 16 - The Eagle nebula
The Eagle Nebula (catalogued as Messier 16 or M16, and as NGC 6611, and also known as the Star Queen Nebula and The Spire) is a young open cluster of stars in the constellation Serpens. Both the "Eagle" and the "Star Queen" refer to visual impressions of the dark silhouette near the center of the nebula, an area made famous as the "Pillars of Creation" imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. The nebula contains several active star-forming gas and dust regions, including the aforementioned Pillars of Creation.
The Eagle Nebula is part of a diffuse emission nebula, or H II region, which is catalogued as IC 4703. This region of active current star formation is about 5700 light-years distant. A spire of gas that can be seen coming off the nebula in the northeastern part is approximately 9.5 light-years or about 90 trillion kilometers long. The cluster associated with the nebula has approximately 8100 stars, which are mostly concentrated in a gap in the molecular cloud to the north-west of the Pillars.
Imaging telescopes or lenses:
TSAPO65Q TS - Optics TS APO65Q , Astro Tech AT106LE
Imaging cameras:
ZWO ASI294MC Pro , QHYCCD QHY183M
Mounts:
SkyWatcher EQ6 belt-modded , SkyWatcher EQ3 Pro SynScan GoTo
Guiding telescopes or lenses:
Skywatcher 9x50 finder guider , Astro Tech AT106LE
Guiding cameras:
QHYCCD QHY 5 II L M , QHYCCD 5
Focal reducers:
TS-Optics TSFlat2 Flattener
Software:
Astro Pixel Processor Astro Pixel Precessor , Adobe Phosotshop CC 2019 , Stellarium 0.19.1 , Sequence Generator PRO , PixInsight , SharpCap pro
Filters:
Baader Planetarium O3 1.25" 8.5nm , Astronomik 6nm Ha Clip-In Filter , Baader 1.25" Ultra-narrowband 3.5nm Ha
Accessory:
Starlight Xpress USB filter-wheel 7x1.25" , Rigel Systems GSUSB nStep Focuser , Moonlite 2.5 inch Focuser with high resolution stepper motor , Pegasus Astro FocusCube , TS OAG 9mm , QHYCCD Polemaster
Frames:
Astronomik 6nm Ha Clip-In Filter: 69x300" (gain: 200.00) -15C bin 1x1
Baader Planetarium O3 1.25" 8.5nm: 39x300" (gain: 11.00) -20C bin 1x1
Baader 1.25" Ultra-narrowband 3.5nm Ha: 450x300" (gain: 11.00) -20C bin 1x1
Integration: 10.8 hours
Darks: ~50
Flats: ~30
Flat darks: ~100
Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 6.00
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NGC 457 - The Owl cluster
NGC 457 (also known as the Owl Cluster, the ET Cluster, or Caldwell 13) is an open star cluster in the constellation Cassiopeia. It lies over 7,900 light years away from the Sun and t has an estimated age of 21 million years. The cluster is sometimes referred by amateur astronomers as the Owl Cluster, Kachina Doll Cluster, the ET Cluster (due to its resemblance to the movie character) or the "Skiing Cluster".
Two bright stars, magnitude 5 Phi-1 Cassiopeiae and magnitude 7 Phi-2 Cassiopeiae can be imagined as eyes.
The cluster features a rich field of about 150 stars of magnitudes 12-15.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
IDAS LPS-D2
QHY5ii-L M guidecamera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, APT, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6-7
Total integration time: 3.4 hours
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North America complex in Bi colour
(15 pane mosaic, 150 hours total integration time)
The North America Nebula (NGC 7000 or Caldwell 20) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, close to Deneb (the tail of the swan and its brightest star). The remarkable shape of the nebula resembles that of the continent of North America, complete with a prominent Gulf of Mexico. It is sometimes incorrectly called the "North American Nebula".
The North America Nebula is large, covering an area of more than four times the size of the full moon; but its surface brightness is low, so normally it cannot be seen with the unaided eye. Binoculars and telescopes with large fields of view (approximately 3°) will show it as a foggy patch of light under sufficiently dark skies. However, using a UHC filter, which filters out some unwanted wavelengths of light, it can be seen without magnification under dark skies. Its prominent shape and especially its reddish color (from the hydrogen Hα emission line) show up only in photographs of the area.
The portion of the nebula resembling Mexico and Central America is known as the Cygnus Wall. This region exhibits the most concentrated star formation.
The North America Nebula and the nearby Pelican Nebula (IC 5070) are parts of the same interstellar cloud of ionized hydrogen (H II region). Between the Earth and the nebula complex lies a band of interstellar dust that absorbs the light of stars and nebulae behind it, and thereby determines the shape as we see it. The distance of the nebula complex is not precisely known, nor is the star responsible for ionizing the hydrogen so that it emits light. If the star inducing the ionization is Deneb, as some sources say, the nebula complex would be about 1,800 light-years' distance, and its absolute size (6° apparent diameter on the sky) would be 100 light-years.
The nebula was discovered by William Herschel, from Slough, England, on October 24, 1786 or by his son John Herschel before 1833.
This is my biggest ever project.
A 15 panel mosaic of the North America nebula region shot with both my setups at the same time.
I used my ASI294MC Pro with the AT106 to shoot Tri-band and Ha and my QHY183M on the TS65Q to shoot Ha and Oiii so the total integration time is 150 hours but the imaging time is half of that.
Before the mosaic I have the cameras swapped between the 2 scopes but I changed them over for a closer field of view and pixel scale between the 2.
I started shooting the mosaic in April this year and I finished it last month, in September.
Using APP, I extracted the Ha shot with the 294 and Ha filter and the Ha and Oiii shot with the tri-band. After that I stacked all the Ha and Oiii for each panel and blended them all in APP.
I used pixinsight Starnet++ to remove the stars from both Ha and Oiii, I blended them into the HOO image and worked on it until I was ready to put the stars back.
I'm really pleased with the result, it might not be perfect but I can say that it's my best astro image so far.
I hope you like it too.
Imaging telescopes or lenses:
TSAPO65Q TS - Optics TS APO65Q , Astro Tech AT106LE
Imaging cameras:
ZWO ASI294MC Pro , QHYCCD QHY183M
Mounts:
SkyWatcher EQ6 belt-modded , SkyWatcher EQ3 Pro SynScan GoTo
Guiding telescopes or lenses:
Skywatcher 9x50 finder guider , Astro Tech AT106LE
Guiding cameras:
QHYCCD QHY 5 II L M , QHYCCD 5
Focal reducers:
TS-Optics TSFlat2 Flattener
Software:
Astro Pixel Processor Astro Pixel Precessor , Adobe Phosotshop CC 2019 , Stellarium 0.19.1 , Sequence Generator PRO , PixInsight , SharpCap pro
Filters:
Baader Planetarium O3 1.25" 8.5nm , Astronomik 6nm Ha Clip-In Filter , Baader 1.25" Ultra-narrowband 3.5nm Ha , Altair Astro triband
Accessory:
Starlight Xpress USB filter-wheel 7x1.25" , Rigel Systems GSUSB nStep Focuser , Moonlite 2.5 inch Focuser with high resolution stepper motor , Pegasus Astro FocusCube , TS OAG 9mm , QHYCCD Polemaster
Frames:
Astronomik 6nm Ha Clip-In Filter: 450x300" (gain: 200.00) -15C bin 1x1
Baader Planetarium O3 1.25" 8.5nm: 450x300" (gain: 11.00) -20C bin 1x1
Baader 1.25" Ultra-narrowband 3.5nm Ha: 450x300" (gain: 11.00) -20C bin 1x1
Altair Astro triband: 450x300" (gain: 200.00) -15C bin 1x1
Integration: 150.0 hours
Darks: ~50
Flats: ~30
Flat darks: ~100
Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 6.00
Mean SQM: 19.14
For the 158mpx, full resolution (11972x13212) photo please follow the link to my astrobin account:
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NGC7023 - Iris nebula
Iris nebula
The Iris Nebula, also known as NGC 7023 and Caldwell 4, is a bright reflection nebula and Caldwell object in the constellation Cepheus. NGC 7023 is actually the cluster within the nebula, LBN 487, and the nebula is lit by a magnitude +7 star, SAO 19158. It lies 1,300 light-years away and is six light-years across.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
IDAS LPS-D1 and IDAS LPS-D2 filters
Qhy5 and QHY5ii-L M guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, APT, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Total integration time: 30 hours
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Messier 33 - Triangulum galaxy
Published in the BBC Sky at night Magazine December 2020 issue

Messier 33 - The Triangulum galaxy.
The Triangulum Galaxy is a spiral galaxy approximately 3 million light-years (ly) from Earth in the constellation Triangulum. It is catalogued as Messier 33 or NGC 598. The Triangulum Galaxy is the third-largest member of the Local Group of galaxies, behind the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy. It is one of the most distant permanent objects that can be viewed with the naked eye.
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
Canon 600D full spectrum modified
ASI294MC Pro
IDAS LPS-D1 clip in filter
2" IDAS LPS-D2
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, APT, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, Astrotortilla, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date: 10, 13, 16.08.2018 and 12, 13, 14, 15, 19, 20.09.2020
Total integration time 24 hours
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SH2-155, The Cave Nebula
SH2-155, The Cave Nebula
Sh2-155 (also designated Caldwell 9, Sharpless 155 or S155) is a diffuse nebula in the constellation Cepheus, within a larger nebula complex containing emission, reflection, and dark nebulosity.
It is widely known as the Cave Nebula, though that name was applied earlier to Ced 201, a different nebula in Cepheus.
Sh2-155 is an ionized H II region with ongoing star formation activity, at an estimated distance of 725 parsecs (2400 light-years) from Earth.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
Qhyccd QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at - 20°C
7x1.25" Starlight Xpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 7nm Ha, 8.5nm Oiii and 8nm Sii
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 20.08 to 10.10.2019
Location: Bushey, bortle 6
Total integration time 18 hours and 30 minutes
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2019
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NGC7129 - The Rosebud Nebula
NGC 7129 is a reflection nebula located 3,300 light years away in the constellation Cepheus. A young open cluster is responsible for illuminating the surrounding nebula. A recent survey indicates the cluster contains more than 130 stars less than 1 million years old. NGC 7129 is located just half a degree from nearby cluster NGC 7142.
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq6 Hypertuned gen2
Upgraded Carbon fibre Skywatcher 10" quattro telescope
QHY10 OSC CCD, cooled at -15°C
Skywatcher 0.9x coma corrector
2" IDAS LPS-D1
Lacerta mgen standalone autoguider
9x50 finder-guider
Upgraded Skywatcher explorer 200p, f5 newtonian
Canon 450D astromodified
IDAS LPS-D1 clip in filter
Baader mpcc coma corrector
Software used: Eqmod, APT, Stellarium with StellariumScope, Astrotortilla, Lacerta mgen software.
Location: Graston Copse Holiday Park, Bortle 4 and Bushey, UK, Bortle 6
Date: 12.06.2018 to 14.09.2018
450D - 20x600sec and 19x360sec ISO800
QHY10 - 46x600sec Gain 15 Offset 118
Stacked and calibrated in APP, Processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop 2020 CC
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Messier 13 - Hercules Globular Cluster
Globular clusters are spherical collection of stars that orbit a galactic core. Globular clusters are very tightly bound by gravity, which gives them their spherical shapes, and relatively high stellar densities toward their centers. The name of this category of star cluster is derived from the Latin, globulus—a small sphere. Occasionally, a globular cluster is known simply as a globular.
Globular clusters are found in the halo of a galaxy and contain considerably more stars, and are much older than the less dense open clusters, which are found in the disk of a galaxy. Globular clusters are fairly common; there are about 150 to 158 currently known globular clusters in the Milky Way, with perhaps 10 to 20 more still undiscovered.
One of the globular cluster in out galaxy is Messier 13 or M13. Also designated NGC 6205 and sometimes called the Great Globular Cluster in Hercules or the Hercules Globular Cluster containins several hundred thousand stars and can be found at a distance of 22,200–25,000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Hercules.
Although it is about 145 light-years in diameter, the stars are so densely packed together that they sometimes collide and produce new stars. The newly formed, young stars, so-called "blue stragglers," are particularly interesting to astronomers.
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertuned
Skywatcher 200p
Baader MPCC coma corrector
IDAS LPS D1 Clip in filter
Canon 450Da and Canon 700da
AstroTech 106LE (690mm) APO Triplet with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
IDAS LPS-D2 2" filter
Qhy5II-L M guide camera
Celestron 400mm Guidescope
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
Qhyccd QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at - 20°C
7x1.25" Starlight Xpress USB filterwheel
Baader RGB 1.25" filters,
Qhy5 guidecamera
TS09OAG off axis guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, APT - Astrophotography Tool, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Bushey, UK bortle 6
QHY183M: 40x120 sec for each RGB (Gain 11, Offset 8)
ASI294MC Pro: 57x120 sec IDAS LPS-D2 (Gain 125, Offset 30)
48x180sec IDAS LPS-D2 (Gain 125, Offset 30)
Canon 450Da: 32x150 sec
Canon 700Da: 10x120 sec
Total integration time 10 hours
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2021
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NGC2403 (Cadwell 7)
NGC 2403 (also known as Caldwell 7) is an intermediate spiral galaxy in the constellation Camelopardalis.
It is an outlying member of the M81 Group, and is approximately 8 million light-years distant. It bears a similarity to M33, being about 50,000 light years in diameter and containing numerous star-forming H II regions.
The northern spiral arm connects it to the star forming region NGC 2404.
NGC 2403 can be observed using 10×50 binoculars.
NGC 2404 is 2000 light-years in diameter, making it one of the largest known H II regions, even larger than Tarantula Nebula in Large Magellanic Cloud. This H II region represents striking similarity with NGC 604 in M33, both in size and location in galaxy.
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
Altair 2" TriBand filter
IDAS LPS-D2 2" filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used: Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Tri-Band filter: 32x600sec Gain 200 Offset 10
IDAS LPS-D2 filter: 281x300sec Gain 125 Offset 30
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date: 20.02.2020 to 26.04.2020
Total integration time: 28 hours and 45minutes
Calibrated in APP with darks, flats and dark flats, stacked in DeepSkyStacker and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop
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Abell 39
Abell 39 is a low surface brightness planetary nebula in the constellation of Hercules. It is the 39th entry in George Abell's 1966 Abell Catalog of Planetary Nebulae (and 27th in his 1955 catalog) of 86 old planetary nebulae which either Abell or Albert George Wilson discovered before August 1955 as part of the National Geographic Society - Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. It is estimated to be about 6,800 light-years from earth and 4,600 light-years above the Galactic plane. It is almost perfectly spherical and also one of the largest known spheres with a radius of about 2.5 light-years.
Its central star is slightly west of center by about 2″ or 0.1 light-years. This offset does not appear to be due to interaction with the interstellar medium, but instead, it is hypothesized that a small asymmetric mass ejection has accelerated the central star. The mass of the central star is estimated to be about 0.61 solar masses with the material in the planetary nebula comprising an additional 0.6 solar mass.
This planetary nebula has a nearly uniform spherical shell. However, the eastern limb of the nebula is 50% more luminous than the western limb. Additionally, irregularities in the surface brightness are seen across the face of the shell. The source of the east–west asymmetry is not known but it could be related to the offset of the central star. The central star is classified as a subdwarf O star.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE (690mm) APO Triplet with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
Qhyccd QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at - 20°C
7x1.25" Starlight Xpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 3.5nm Ha Ultra-narrowband, 7nm Ha, 8.5nm Oiii and RGB
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 06.02.2020 to 16.04.2020
Location: Bushey, UK bortle 6
Total integration time 11.5 hours
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2019
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The Crab Nebula and The Crab Pulsar
On the 4th July 1054 the Chinese astronomers observed and recorded a cataclysmic event in our Milky Way, when a massive star ended its life by turning into a supernova.
The remnant of the supernova named today as SN 1054, consists of debris ejected during the explosion and it was observed later by English astronomer John Bevis in 1731, being the first astronomical object identified with a historical supernova explosion.
The current, The Crab nebula, is due to William Parsons, 3rd Earl of Rosse, who observed the object in 1840 using a 36-inch telescope and produced a drawing that looked somewhat like a crab. 
The Crab Nebula (catalogue designations M1, NGC 1952, Taurus A), can be found 6500±1600 light years away in the constellation of Taurus and at an apparent magnitude of 8.4, comparable to that of Saturn's moon Titan, it is not visible to the naked eye but can be made out using binoculars under favourable conditions. The nebula lies in the Perseus Arm of the Milky Way galaxy and it has a diameter of 3.4 parsecs (11 ly), corresponding to an apparent diameter of some 7 arcminutes, and is expanding at a rate of about 1,500 kilometres per second (930 mi/s), or 0.5% of the speed of light.
The core of the exploding star became a compact stellar object left behind when the massive star ended its life violently in a core-collapse supernova.This formed the pulsar that we call the Crab Pulsar (or PSR B0531+21).
A pulsar (from pulse and -ar as in quasar) is a highly magnetized rotating neutron star that emits beams of electromagnetic radiation out of its magnetic poles. Neutron stars are very dense, and have short, regular rotational periods.
The Crab Pulsar is one of very few pulsars to be identified optically. The optical pulsar is roughly 20 kilometres (12 mi) in diameter and has the rotational period about 33 milliseconds, that is, the pulsar "beams" perform about 30 revolutions per second.

Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE (690mm) APO Triplet with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
Qhyccd QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at - 20°C
7x1.25" Starlight Xpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 3.5nm Ha Ultra-narrowband, 7nm Ha, 8.5nm Oiii and RGB
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
Qhyccd Polemaster

Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 19.09.2019 to 09.04.2020
Location: Bushey, UK bortle 6
Total integration time 23.2 hours
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2019
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Headphones nebula - Jones-Emberson 1 (PK 164+31.1)
Jones-Emberson 1 (PK 164+31.1), also known as the Headphone Nebula, is a 14th magnitude planetary nebula in the constellation Lynx at a distance of 1600 light years. It is a larger planetary with low surface brightness. The 16.8-magnitude central star is a very blue white dwarf.
Discovered in 1939 by R. Jones and R. Emberson, its "PK" designation comes from the names of Czechoslovakian astronomers Luboš Perek and Luboš Kohoutek, who in 1967 created an extensive catalog of all of the planetary nebulae known in the Milky Way as of 1964. The numbers indicate the position of the object on the sky. ("PK 164+31.1" basically represents the planetary nebula that when using the galactic coordinate system has a galactic longitude of 164 degrees, a galactic latitude of +31 degrees, and is the first such object in the Perek-Kohoutek catalog to occupy that particular one square degree area of sky).
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
QHYCCD QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at -20°C
7x1.25" StarlightXpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, Ultra-narrowband 3.5nm Ha and 8.5nm Oiii
QHYCCD QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
QHYCCD Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with StellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment.
Location: Bushey, bortle 6
Date: 17 Jan 2020 to 02 March 2020
70x600sec Gain 11 Ha
66x600sec Gain 11 Oiii
Total integration time: 22.7 hours
Stacking and calibration in AstroPixel Processor with Dark frames, Flat frames and Dark Flat frames. Channel combination in AstroPixel Processor
Processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2019
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Rosette nebula
The Rosette NebulaAlso known as Caldwell 49, Rosette nebula is a large spherical H II region (circular in appearance) located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster NGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars of the cluster having been formed from the nebula's matter.
The cluster and nebula lie at a distance of some 5,000 light-years from Earth and measure roughly 130 light years in diameter. The radiation from the young stars excites the atoms in the nebula, causing them to emit radiation themselves producing the emission nebula we see. The mass of the nebula is estimated to be around 10,000 solar masses.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro mount
TS65 Quadruplet imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO
Astronomik 6nm Ha clip in filter
Altair 2" Tri-Band filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2, SharpCap for polar alignment
Location: Back garden, Bushey, UK (Bortle 6)
Date: 24.02.2020 to 04.04.2020
Total integration time: 12 hours and 40 minutes
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Leo Triplet
The Leo Triplet

The Leo Triplet, or the M66 Group, is a group of interacting spiral galaxies located in the northern constellation Leo.

The group consists of the galaxies Messier 65, Messier 66 and NGC 3628, also known as the Hamburger Galaxy. The Leo Triplet lies at an approximate distance of 35 million light years from Earth.

The three large spiral galaxies can be seen in a single field of view and are well viewed even in small telescopes. Their galactic disks are tilted at different angles when seen from Earth. NGC 3628 appears edge-on, while M65 and M66 are inclined enough to reveal their spiral arms.

The M66 Group is located in the eastern part of Leo constellation, along the line from the bright star Denebola to Regulus. The galaxies are located between the stars Chertan, Theta Leonis, and Iota Leonis.

Messier 66, the largest and brightest member of the Leo Triplet, is roughly 95 light years across. It has an apparent size of 9.1 by 4.2 minutes of arc and an apparent magnitude of 8.9.

Messier 65 has a visual magnitude of 10.25 and occupies an area of 8.709 by 2.454 arc minutes of apparent sky. It is an intermediate spiral galaxy, poor in dust and gas, and shows little evidence of star formation.

NGC 3628 or The Hamburger Galaxy is an unbarred spiral galaxy with a visual magnitude of 10.2. Seen edge-on, the galaxy occupies an area of 15 by 3.6 arc minutes and appears transected by a broad band of dust that stretches along its outer edge, hiding the young stars in the galaxy’s spiral arms.

The three galaxies in the M66 Group have all been affected by gravitational interactions with each other. This is evident in the deformed, drawn out spiral arms of M66 that are experiencing a high rate of star forming activity and in the warped, inflated disk of NGC 3628. With a prominent tidal tail consisting mainly of young blue stars, NGC 3628 seems to be the most affected of the three, while M65 appears to have suffered the least damage from the interaction. The tidal tail of NGC 3628 spans over 300,000 light years, but is very faint and does not always appear in images of the galaxy.
Source: messier-objects.com

Equipment used:
Eq6 Pro
Skywatcher explorer 200p, f5 newtonian
Astromodified Canon 700D
Astronomik CLS-CCD clip in filter
Baader mpcc coma corrector
Lacerta Mgen standalone autoguider
TS09OAG off axis guider for EOS.

Software used:
Eqmod, APT, Stellarium with StellariumScope, Astrotortilla, Lacerta Autoguider PC app

Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date:24 and 31.03.2017

The image is the result of photos taken during two imaging sessions with a total exposure time of 5 hours and 40 minutes and is composed of 15x300sec, 13x600sec and 9x900sec exposures all at ISO400 with 49 flat frames and 20 bias frames. The calibration and stacking has been done in DSS and processing in Photoshop and Lightroom.

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Andromeda Galaxy
Something is moving towards us at the incredible speed of 250,000 miles per hour.
The Andromeda galaxy
Also known as Messier 31, M31 or NGC 224, located 2.5 million light years away from us, the Andromeda galaxy is on a collision course with our own Milky Way. But not to worry, it will only happen in 4 to 5 billion years time so none of us will be there to witness it.
Previously thought that it's around 40% bigger than our galaxy and that our Milky Way will be gulped by this galactic neighbour, recent studies concluded that Andromeda is roughly the same size and the 2 galaxies will merge into a gigantic elliptical galaxy.
Andromeda is a large spiral galaxy that can be seen with the naked eye from a dark location. In fact it's the furthest deep sky object that can be seen with the naked eye. If we were to see it in all its splendour, on its long axis, the Andromeda galaxy would appear 4 to 5 times the size of the full moon.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ASI294MC Pro cooled at -15°C
QHY10 osc CCD cooled at -15°C
Astromodified Canon 600D
Astronomik 6nm Ha Clip filter
2" IDAS LPS-D1 filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used: Eqmod, APT, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey UK, Bortle 6
It's a combination of 1min, 2min, 4min, 5min, 10min and 15min exposures bringing the total integration time to 22 hours and 11 minutes 
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IC2177 - Seagull Nebula
IC 2177 is a region of nebulosity that lies along the border between the constellations Monoceros and Canis Major. It is a roughly circular H II region centered on the Be star HD 53367. This nebula was discovered by Welsh amateur astronomer Isaac Roberts and was described by him as "pretty bright, extremely large, irregularly round, very diffuse."
The name Seagull Nebula is sometimes applied by amateur astronomers to this emission region, although it more properly includes the neighboring regions of star clusters, dust clouds and reflection nebulae. This latter region includes the open clusters NGC 2335 and NGC 2343.
NGC 2327 is located in IC 2177. It is also known as the Seagull's Head, due to its larger presence in the Seagull nebula.
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
Altair 2" TriBand filter
Astronomik 6nm Ha Clip filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date: 04.02.2020 to 26.03.2020
Total integration time: 19.2 hours
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NGC2359 - Thor's Helmet in HOO
NGC 2359 (also known as Thor's Helmet) is an emission nebula in the constellation Canis Major. The nebula is approximately 15,000 light years away and 30 light-years in size. The central star is the Wolf-Rayet star WR7, an extremely hot star thought to be in a brief pre-supernova stage of evolution. It is similar in nature to the Bubble Nebula, but interactions with a nearby large molecular cloud are thought to have contributed to the more complex shape and curved bow-shock structure of Thor's Helmet.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
QHYCCD QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at -20°C
7x1.25" StarlightXpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, Ultra-narrowband 3.5nm Ha and 8.5nm Oiii
QHYCCD QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
QHYCCD Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with StellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment.
Location: Bushey, bortle 6
Date: 15 Dec 2019 to 03 March 2020
115x300sec Gain 11 Ha
114x300sec Gain 11 Oiii

Total integration time: 19.1 hours
Stacking and calibration in AstroPixel Processor with Dark frames, Flat frames and Dark Flat frames. Channel combination in AstroPixel Processor
Processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2019
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Jellyfish nebula in HaLRGB. In collaboration with C G Astrophotography by Carl Gough
IC 443 (also known as the Jellyfish Nebula and Sharpless 248 (Sh2-248)) is a Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) in the constellation Gemini. On the plan of the sky, it is located near the star Eta Geminorum. Its distance is roughly 5,000 light years from Earth.
IC 443 may be the remains of a supernova that occurred 3,000 - 30,000 years ago. The same supernova event likely created the neutron star CXOU J061705.3+222127, the collapsed remnant of the stellar core. IC 443 is one of the best-studied cases of supernova remnants interacting with surrounding molecular clouds.
Equipment used by me:
Eq3 pro mount
TS65 Quadruplet imaging telescope
ASI294MC Pro
Astronomik 6nm Ha, Altair Tri-Band, IDAS NB1 and IDAS LPS-D2 filters
QHY5 guidecamera
9x50 finder-guider
Equipment used by Carl:
EQ5 pro mount
TS80 Apo Triplet telescope
ASI1600MM Pro
Baader 7.5nm Ha filter
Total integration time 28 hours and 30 minutes with 8 hours and 20 minutes total Ha data from Carl and 20 hours and 10 minutes HaRGB from me.
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Messier 76 - The Little Dumbbell nebula
Stars like out Sun are destined to end their lives by shedding their outer layers during the evolutionary process of transition from a hydrogen burning main sequence star to a red giant and eventually a white dwarf.
The layers of dust and gas ejected, are forming nebulae of different shapes and sizes that expand light years into space. William Herschel called them planetary nebulae because they sometimes take the shapes of planets but in fact they have nothing to do with them.
At the center of each planetary nebula lays the star that finished burning its hydrogen and ejected its outer layers. They can sometimes be captured with the help of a telescope and a camera.
Messier 76, also called, The Little Dumbbell nebula, NGC 650/651, the Barbell Nebula, or the Cork Nebula, is a planetary nebula, 2544 light years away in the Perseus constellation.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
Qhyccd QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at - 20°C
7x1.25" Starlight Xpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 3.5nm Ha Ultra-narrowband, 7nm Ha, 8.5nm Oiii and 8nm Sii
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
Qhyccd Polemaster

Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 19.09.2019 to 16.02.2020
Location: Bushey, UK bortle 6
Total integration time 35 hours and 40 minutes
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2019
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The Deer Lick group and Stephan's quintet
NGC 7331 Group (top right) is a group of galaxies in the constellationPegasus. Spiral galaxy NGC 7331 is the brightest member of the group. This group is also called the Deer Lick Group, and contains four other members; NGC 7335, NGC 7336, NGC 7337 and NGC 7340, affectionately referred to as the "fleas".
Stephan's Quintet (bottom left) is a visual grouping of five galaxies of which four form the first compact galaxy group ever discovered. The group, visible in the constellation Pegasus, was discovered by Édouard Stephan in 1877 at the Marseille Observatory. The group is the most studied of all the compact galaxy groups. The brightest member of the visual grouping is NGC 7320 that is shown to have extensive H II regions, identified as red blobs, where active star formation is occurring.
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq6 Hypertuned gen2
Skywatcher 200p
Upgraded Carbon fibre Skywatcher 10" quattro
Astromodified Canon 450D
QHY10 osc cooled CCD
Skywatcher 0.9x coma corrector
Baader mpcc iii coma corrector
IDAS LPS-D1
Lacerta mgen standalone autoguider
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, APT, Stellarium with StellariumScope, Astrotortilla, Lacerta mgen software.
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date: 02, 03, 11, 16.08.2018 and 08.09.2018
The image is the result of 15 hours and 16 minutes worth of exposures stacked and calibrated in pixinsight and processed in Pixinsight, Fitswork, Astropixel processor and PS 2019 CC.
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The Pleiades, M45
The Pleiades, also known as the Seven Sisters and Messier 45, are an open star cluster containing middle-aged, hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky.
The cluster is dominated by hot blue and luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. A faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternative name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now likely an unrelated foreground dust cloud in the interstellar medium, through which the stars are currently passing.
Distance to Earth: 444.2 light years
Constellation: Taurus
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
Canon 700D astro modified, QHY10, ASI294MC Pro
IDAS LPS-D1 clip in filter, IDAS LPS-D2
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
457 exposures ranging from 2 min to 10 min, total integration time 21.4 hours
Software used: Eqmod, APT, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location:  Bushey, UK, Bortle 6
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The Veil Nebula - The Cygnus Loop (2 Pane Mosaic)
The Veil Nebula is a cloud of heated and ionized gas and dust in the constellation Cygnus. It constitutes the visible portions of the Cygnus Loop (radio source W78, or Sharpless 103), a large but relatively faint supernova remnant. The source supernova exploded circa 3,000 BC to 6,000 BC, and the remnants have since expanded to cover an area roughly 3 degrees in diameter (about 6 times the diameter, or 36 times the area, of the full Moon). The distance to the nebula is not precisely known, but Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) data supports a distance of about 1,470 light-years.
Components:
In modern usage, the names Veil Nebula, Cirrus Nebula, and Filamentary Nebula generally refer to all the visible structure of the remnant, or even to the entire loop itself. The structure is so large that several NGC numbers were assigned to various arcs of the nebula. There are three main visual components:
The Western Veil (also known as Caldwell 34), consisting of NGC 6960 (the "Witch's Broom", "Finger of God", or "Filamentary Nebula") near the foreground star 52 Cygni;
The Eastern Veil (also known as Caldwell 33), whose brightest area is NGC 6992, trailing off farther south into NGC 6995 (together with NGC 6992 also known as "Network Nebula") and IC 1340; and
Pickering's Triangle (or Pickering's Triangular Wisp), brightest at the north central edge of the loop, but visible in photographs continuing toward the central area of the loop.
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
Altair Astro 2" Tri-band filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, APT, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2 and mosaic planning with EQmosaic.
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date: 5, 14, 15, 16, 18 and 20.07.2019
The photo is a blend of 2 images shot over the course of 6 nights, 3 nights for the Western Veil and 3 nights for the Eastern Veil.
60x300sec exposures per panel, Gain 200 Offset 10, stacked and calibrated in DSS with darks, flats and dark flat frames.
The 2 images have been stacked and blended in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Photoshop CC 2019.
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Elephant's Trunk Nebula
The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is a concentration of interstellar gas and dust within the much larger ionized gas region IC 1396 located in the constellation Cepheus about 2,400 light years away from Earth.
The Elephant's Trunk Nebula is now thought to be a site of star formation, containing several very young (less than 100,000 yr) stars that were discovered in infrared images in 2003.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
Altair 2" TriBand filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date: 18, 19, 20, 21 and 28.09.2019
Total integration time: 16.7 hours
The image is the result of 25x600sec Gain 200 Offset 10 exposures for each panel stacked and calibrated in APP with dark, flat and dark flat frames, blended as mosaic in APP. ABE in pixinsight, initial stretch in APP and processed in Photoshop CC 2019
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Busy part of the Auriga Constellation, 4 panel mosaic
IC405 (Flaming Star), IC410 (NGC1893, The Tadpoles nebula), IC417 (The Spider nebula), NGC1931 (the Fly nebula), NGC1907 (Open Cluster)
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
Altair 2" TriBand filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date: 18, 21, 27, 28.09 and 03, 10, 28.10.2019
Total integration time: 17 hours and 30 minutes
The image is the result of 25x600sec for 3 of the panels and 30x600sec for the Tadpoles panel. Gain 200 Offset 10 exposures for each panel stacked and calibrated in APP with dark, flat and dark flat frames, blended as mosaic in APP. Initial stretch in APP and processed in Photoshop CC 2019.
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The Cygnus wall in Hubble palette
The Cygnus Wall complex is part of the North America nebula which spans over a large portion of the night sky covering an area four times larger than the full moon.
Cygnus Wall is the portion of the North America nebula that's resembling Mexico and Central America.
The Cygnus Wall is the region with the most concentrated star formation.
Equipment used:
Eq6 Hypertuned gen2 by DarkFrame LTD
Skywatcher 130pds f5 newtonian telescope
AT106LE with moonlite focuser
Rigel nStep atofocuser
QHY183m Coldmos, cooled at -20°C
Skywatcher x0.9 coma corrector
TSFlat 2" field Flattener
7x1.25" StarlightXpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" 7nm Ha filter
Baader 1.25" 8.5nm Oiii filter
Baader 1.25" 8nm Sii filter
TS65Q as guidescope
QHY5L-IIM guidecam
QHYCCD Polemaster hi
TS 09 OAG off axis guider
Software used:
Eqmod, APT, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
More details on my Astrobin account
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The Double Cluster in Perseus
The Double Cluster is the common name for the open clusters NGC 869 and NGC 884, which are close together in the constellation Perseus. Both visible with the naked eye, NGC 869 and NGC 884 lie at a distance of 7500 light years.
NGC 869 has a mass of 3700 solar masses and NGC 884 weighs in at 2800 solar masses; however, later research has shown both clusters are surrounded with a very extensive halo of stars, with a total mass for the complex of at least 20,000 solar masses. Based on their individual stars, the clusters are relatively young, both 12.8 million years old. In comparison, the Pleiades have an estimated age ranging from 75 million years to 150 million years. There are more than 300 blue-white super-giant stars in each of the clusters. The clusters are also blueshifted, with NGC 869 approaching Earth at a speed of 39 km/s (24 mi/s) and NGC 884 approaching at a similar speed of 38 km/s (24 mi/s). Their hottest main sequence stars are of spectral type B0.
Details on my astrobin account:
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California Nebula
The California Nebula (NGC 1499) is an emission nebula located in the constellation Perseus. It is so named because it appears to resemble the outline of the US State of California on long exposure photographs. It is almost 2.5° long on the sky and, because of its very low surface brightness, it is extremely difficult to observe visually. It can be observed with a Hβ filter in a rich-field telescope under dark skies. It lies at a distance of about 1,000 light years from Earth. Its fluorescence is due to excitation of the Hβ line in the nebula by the nearby prodigiously energetic O7 star, xi Persei (also known as Menkib).
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
Altair 2" TriBand filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date: 14, 18, 20, 21 and 30.09.2019
Total integration time: 12 hours and 5 minutes
The image is the result of 129x300sec and 8x600 sec Gain 200 Offset 10 exposures stacked and calibrated in APP with dark, flat and dark flat frames. Initial stretch in APP and processed in Photoshop CC 2019.
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The Fireworks Galaxy (NGC 6946), the star cluster NGC 6939
and the SN2017eaw supernova
The Fireworks Galaxy also known as NGC 6946 is an intermediate spiral galaxy about 22 million light-years away, in the constellations of Cepheus and Cygnus. The Fireworks Galaxy gets its name from the number of supernovae that set off in the galaxy. The latest one is called SN2017eaw (marked in the photo) and it was discovered early 2017 by an amateur astronomer. It's the 10 supernova to set off in the last century.
NGC 6939 (bottom right) is an open cluster in the constellation Cepheus. The cluster lies approximately 4.000 light years away and it is over a billion years old.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2
Upgraded Skywatcher explorer 200p, f5 newtonian
Canon 700D baader astromodified
IDAS LPS-D1 clip in filter
Baader mpcc coma corrector
Lacerta Mgen standalone autoguider
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, APT, Stellarium with StellariumScope, Astrotortilla, Lacerta Autoguider PC app
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
The image is the result of 19x900sec ISO400 exposures stacked and calibrated in DSS with 35 flat frames and 400 bias frames and processed in PS CC 2019 and Lr CC.
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Heart and Soul nebulas, 4 panel mosaic
20x600sec per panel
ASI294MC Pro, TS65 quadruplet and Altair Tri-band filter.
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Y Cas nebulae or The Ghost of Cassiopeia, IC 63 and IC 59
The "Ghost of Cassiopeia" are some slowly eroding clouds of gas and dust.
The nebulae, called IC 63 and IC 59, drift 550 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cassiopeia. Their ethereal shape is influenced from afar by the fiercely shining variable star called Gamma Cassiopeiae. Though the star is several light-years from the nebula, it makes its powerful presence felt with blasts of radiation.
The blue-white subgiant star has 19 times the sun's mass and can reach 65,000 times the sun's brightness as it rotates at 1 million miles (1.6 million kilometers) per hour, which is more than 200 times the speed of the sun's rotation, according to the statement. It's surrounded by a disk of material that periodically blasts with material during its furious spin, making the star temporarily blaze brighter in the northern night sky.
Gamma Cassiopeiae contributes in two different ways to the nebula's creepy color palette. First, ultraviolet radiation from the star makes its way to the nebula, energizing its hydrogen molecules and prompting them to release a deep-red glow of hydrogen-alpha light. And second, light from the star reflects off the nebula's dust, glowing a cool blue.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
TS65 quadruplet f6.5 imaging telescope
ZWO ASI294MC PRO cooled at -15°C
Altair 2" TriBand filter
Qhy5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Date: 19 and 27.10.2019
Total integration time: 6.7 hours
The image is the result of 40x600 sec Gain 200 Offset 10 exposures stacked and calibrated in AstroPixel Processor with dark, flat and dark flat frames. Initial stretch in APP and processed in Photoshop CC 2019. Artificial star spikes added for effect with the StarSpike Pro add on in photoshop.
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IC 1795 - The Fish Head nebula
IC 1795 is an area of gas and dust and also a star forming region in the northern constellation Cassiopeia.
IC 1795 is an extension of the larger Heart nebula or IC 1805.
The brightest part of the nebula has the designation NGC 896 in the New General Catalogue. It is classified separately
because it was the first part of IC 1805 to be discovered.
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
TSFlat 2" field flattener
Qhyccd QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at - 20°C
7x1.25" Starlight Xpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 7nm Ha, 8.5nm Oiii and 8nm Sii
Qhyccd QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
Qhyccd Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, PHD2, Stellarium with stellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment
Date: 14.09 to 11.12.2019
Location: Bushey, bortle 6
Total integration time 19 hours
Stacked in AstroPixel Processor and processed in Pixinsight and Photoshop CC 2019
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NGC6888 - The Crescent nebula
The Crescent Nebula in HOO
The Crescent Nebula (also known as NGC 6888, Caldwell 27, Sharpless 105) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, about 5000 light-yearsaway from Earth. It was discovered by William Herschel in 1792. It is formed by the fast stellar wind from the Wolf-Rayet star WR 136 (HD 192163) colliding with and energizing the slower moving wind ejected by the star when it became a red giant around 250,000 to 400,000 years ago.
It is a rather faint object located about 2 degrees SW of Sadr. For most telescopes it requires a UHC or OIII filter to see. Under favorable circumstances a telescope as small as 8 cm (with filter) can see its nebulosity. Larger telescopes (20 cm or more) reveal the crescent or a Euro sign shape which makes some to call it the "Euro sign nebula".
Source: Wikipedia
Equipment used:
Eq6 hypertune gen2 by DarkFrame Ltd
Skywatcher 130pds f5 newtonian telescope
Skywatcher x0.9 coma corrector
AstroTech 106LE with upgraded Moonlite focuser
QHYCCD QHY183M Coldmos, cooled at -20°C
7x1.25" StarlightXpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" filters, 7nm Ha 8.5nm Oiii
QHYCCD QHY5L-IIM guide camera
TS09OAG off axis guider
QHYCCD Polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, APT - Astro Photography Tool, SGP - Sequence Generator Pro, Stellarium with StellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment.
Location: Bushey, bortle 6
Date: 21.04.2019; 15.05.2019; 06, 19, 22 and 24.07.2019; 08.08.2019
74x300sec Gain 11 and 15x600sec Gain 16 Ha
40x600sec Gain 16 Oiii
Total integration time: 15.3 hours
Calibration in Pixinsight with Dark frames, Flat frames and Dark Flat frames, stacking, alignment of the filters and dynamic crop also in Pixinsight.
Processing in Photoshop CC 2019
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DWB111 - The Propeller nebula
DWB 111 or Simeis 57, also known as the Propeller nebula is an emission nebula in the Cygnus constellation.
The distance from Earth is unknown but it is only a small part of a larger emission nebula.
Equipment used:
Eq6 Hypertuned gen2 by DarkFrame LTD
Skywatcher 130pds f5 newtonian telescope
AT106LE with moonlite focuser
Rigel nStep atofocuser
QHY183m Coldmos, cooled at -20°C
Skywatcher x0.9 coma corrector
TSFlat 2" field Flattener
7x1.25" StarlightXpress USB filterwheel
Baader 1.25" 7nm Ha filter
Baader 1.25" 8.5nm Oiii filter
Baader 1.25" 8nm Sii filter
TS65Q as guidescope
QHY5L-IIM guidecam
QHYCCD Polemaster
TS 09 OAG off axis guider
Software used:
Eqmod, APT, SGP, Stellarium with StellariumScope, PHD2
Location: Bushey, Bortle 6
Total integration time: 19 hours
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North America Nebula - Widefield HaLRGB
The North America Nebula (NGC 7000 or Caldwell 20) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, close to Deneb (the tail of the swan and its brightest star). The remarkable shape of the nebula resembles that of the continent of North America, complete with a prominent Gulf of Mexico. It is sometimes incorrectly called the "North American Nebula".
The North America Nebula is large, covering an area of more than four times the size of the full moon; but its surface brightness is low, so normally it cannot be seen with the unaided eye. Binoculars and telescopes with large fields of view (approximately 3°) will show it as a foggy patch of light under sufficiently dark skies. However, using a UHC filter, which filters out some unwanted wavelengths of light, it can be seen without magnification under dark skies. Its prominent shape and especially its reddish color (from the hydrogen Hα emission line) show up only in photographs of the area.
The portion of the nebula resembling Mexico and Central America is known as the Cygnus Wall. This region exhibits the most concentrated star formation.
The North America Nebula and the nearby Pelican Nebula (IC 5070) are parts of the same interstellar cloud of ionized hydrogen (H II region). Between the Earth and the nebula complex lies a band of interstellar dust that absorbs the light of stars and nebulae behind it, and thereby determines the shape as we see it. The distance of the nebula complex is not precisely known, nor is the star responsible for ionizing the hydrogen so that it emits light. If the star inducing the ionization is Deneb, as some sources say, the nebula complex would be about 1,800 light-years' distance, and its absolute size (6° apparent diameter on the sky) would be 100 light-years.
The nebula was discovered by William Herschel, from Slough, England, on October 24, 1786 or by his son John Herschel before 1833.
Equipment used:
Eq3 Pro
Canon 700D astro modified
Samyang 135mm f2 @ f2.8
IDAS LPS-D1 clip in filter
Astronomik 6nm Ha clip in filter
QHY5 guide camera
9x50 finder-guider
QhyCCD polemaster
Software used:
Eqmod, APT for capturing and platesolving, Stellarium with StellariumScope, SharpCap for polar alignment and PHD2 for guiding.
Location: Bushey UK, Bortle 6 for the Ha and Pontarfynach, Wales, Bortle 2 for the RGB
Date: 18, 19 and 20.04.2019 for the Ha and 05.05.2019 for the RGB
The image is the result of 71x300sec ISO1600 exposures for the Hydrogen alpha, 10x180sec ISO800 exposures for the RGB stacked and calibrated in DSS and processed with Photoshop CC 2019 and Lightroom CC.
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